Gail of Green Living


Early Spring Garden–Old Herbs
Thyme

I’ve been learning new things about container gardening; I’ve even signed up for a class with Urban Harvest!  I don’t ever want to stop learning…about organic gardening, real estate, life, etc!  NOTE:  I have never put a chemical fertilizer or bug repellant on my herbs.  They just don’t need it.  A healthy dose of compost a couple of times a year is all they ask!

One thing I know from experience is that herbs are super-duper raised in pots and most last for years!  I have had this pot of Thyme so long, I’m guessing it must be at least 15 years old.  In the winter, the foliage turns reddish, but it tastes the same.  It is a tangled mess, and it just keeps giving!  But having herbs in pots keeps them more contained, because in a garden, they tend to crawl or give out seeds, and they can take over the place!

New Rosemary

The New Rosemary is only about 14 months old at our house, after receiving it as a small Christmas tree last year.

Old Rosemary

The Old Rosemary has been around longer than any other, I think.  It has a wood trunk that has lots of character and the trunk has put out long, flowing fronds full of wonderful fragrance and delicate purple flowers.  These stems don’t even mind the intense heat of the patio in the summer.  We love this herb on chicken and pork roasts and added to garlic new potatoes!

Sweet Marjoram

Sweet Marjoram is from the Oregano family, and this herb is wonderful in stews and soups!  It’s been a part of the herb presence in our yard about 15 years, too.

Oregano

The Oregano bush is about 4′ in diameter and continues to bloom and seed a zillion seeds every year.  I can’t give them all away!  You just can’t make an Italian dish without it!  The Oregano and Sweet Marjoram are way too big to bring in during a freeze, so I just cover them well with a sheet.  They even made it through the 20+ degree freeze we had last winter.

Next time I will post about newer herbs we have added recently.  What herbs have you grown for a long time with success?



Talking about “No” Bugs!

Remember my post “Not Always Good Results”?  I thought I had lost the battle I was having with mealy bugs on my green bell pepper plant.

NOT my usual beautiful green bell pepper plant!

I thought I would remove all the leaves that were damaged by either my vinegar/water bug repellent or the bugs.  After that, I fed the plant with organic bone meal and epsom salts, alternating weeks.

Now, there are many healthy leaves as well as blooms and small peppers!  And there are no bugs (today anyway).  I even enjoyed one in a salad.

So don’t give up when bugs come to call on your organic garden!  Attention and patience can work to turn the situation around in your favor!

Share your success stories for insect control and organic gardening; I’d like to hear your story!